Precision Medicine Can Save Healthcare Costs by Helping to Select the Most Effective Personalized Psoriasis Treatment

The results from this study could be used to help doctors select the right psoriasis medication for the right patient, which will save on the cost of medications and improve patient outcomes.”

— Margaret Snyder, MD

NEW YORK, NY, USA, July 12, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ — Psoriasis is a skin disease that affects approximately 7.5 million people in the United States (U.S.). Psoriasis is characterized by distinct red and itchy plaques on the body and is mostly caused by an overactive immune system, which is the part of the body that fights off bacteria and viruses. This disease is known to be a significant cosmetic concern in patients and also it has been found to negatively affect internal organs such as the heart and blood vessels.

There are currently over 10 injectable medications that are U.S. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approved for the treatment of psoriasis. These medications work by blocking very specific cell messengers in the body that are overactive in psoriasis. Unfortunately, these medications are not a “one-size-fits-all” treatment because they have a very specific target. In other words, the agent most efficacious for one patient may differ from the option that is most suitable for someone else. As a result, there exists the need for an individualized therapeutic approach.

A study published today in SKIN The Journal of Cutaneous Medicine entitled “An Economic Evaluation of The Budget Impact of Precision Medicine Testing for The Treatment of Psoriasis” reports on a new precision medicine test (Mind.Px), which uses transcriptomic technology to determine which drugs will work best for individual patients. The authors present a model which demonstrates how the Mind.Px test could potentially lead to cost savings and ultimately improve patient care.

The budget impact model returned cost savings as low as $5,138 to as high as $13,141 annually, depending on which medications were used. Furthermore, it was shown that patients who are treated initially with the correct drug, experience improved outcomes. An average savings of $8,492 was shown across 6 different drug formularies. This report is the first to estimate the theoretical economic impact of a precision medicine test for injectable psoriasis medications. The results from this study could be used to help doctors select the right psoriasis medication for the right patient, which will save on the cost of medications and improve patient outcomes.

Margaret Snyder, MD
Mount Sinai Department of Dermatology
Margaret.Snyder@mssm.edu


Source: EIN Presswire